Fostering Christian discipleship in the late modern milieu in the diakonia of koinonia and in the recognition that "the Eucharist is the only place of resistance to annihilation of the human subject."

 

From the perspective of his high papal veneration, one cannot simply dismiss Celestine V as “a bad pope.” That he was not an effective pope is beyond historical dispute. He never wanted to be pope! Let’s keep in view the fact that Pietro del Morrone was not elected pope until he was 84, which would be old even now.
Both Benedict and Francis see Celestine V as a model precisely for his humble and even selfless realization and acknowledgment that, as an old man, well past his prime, he was not “up to” the job. In this regard it bears noting that Benedict XVI resigned when he was the same age as Celestine V was when he resigned: 85. As Magister describes it, Celestine V’s “plans for abdication were scrupulously examined from the juridical point of view. And on December 13, in the Castelnuovo in Naples, he read his declaration of resignation before the assembled cardinals. He set aside the pontifical vestments and dressed himself again in the gray robe of his congregation: the pope had again become Pietro del Morrone.”  At least to me, there is something quite beautiful and distinctively Franciscan in Magister’s description of del Morrone’s resignation.

From the perspective of his high papal veneration, one cannot simply dismiss Celestine V as “a bad pope.” That he was not an effective pope is beyond historical dispute. He never wanted to be pope! Let’s keep in view the fact that Pietro del Morrone was not elected pope until he was 84, which would be old even now.

Both Benedict and Francis see Celestine V as a model precisely for his humble and even selfless realization and acknowledgment that, as an old man, well past his prime, he was not “up to” the job. In this regard it bears noting that Benedict XVI resigned when he was the same age as Celestine V was when he resigned: 85. As Magister describes it, Celestine V’s “plans for abdication were scrupulously examined from the juridical point of view. And on December 13, in the Castelnuovo in Naples, he read his declaration of resignation before the assembled cardinals. He set aside the pontifical vestments and dressed himself again in the gray robe of his congregation: the pope had again become Pietro del Morrone.”

At least to me, there is something quite beautiful and distinctively Franciscan in Magister’s description of del Morrone’s resignation.